The Love of Money

Boost your budget by missing worship?

If you miss worship on the first day of week, does that mean your pocket has a little extra in it to spend the rest of the week?

If you answer yes, you have the wrong answer.

Giving as we have been prospered means exactly that – giving as we have been prospered; not giving as long as we show up to worship!

If we miss worship one week, but we prospered that week, then a portion of our prosperity from that week still belongs to God. And to deny that portion of worship is to deny the God who calls us to worship Him (1 Corinthians 16:2). EA

But this I say: He who sows sparingly will also reap sparingly, and he who sows bountifully will also reap bountifully. So let each one give as he purposes in his heart, not grudgingly or of necessity; for God loves a cheerful giver. And God is able to make all grace abound toward you, that you, always having all sufficiency in all things, may have an abundance for every good work. As it is written: “He has dispersed abroad, He has given to the poor; His righteousness endures forever.” Now may He who supplies seed to the sower, and bread for food, supply and multiply the seed you have sown and increase the fruits of your righteousness, while you are enriched in everything for all liberality, which causes thanksgiving through us to God.” (2 Corinthians 9:6-11)

“Well Off” is not always “Better Off”

Have you ever described someone by saying he or she was “well off” when it comes to their finances?

Have you ever realized how “well off” and “better off” can be two different things?

Some Christians have never made more money in their lifetime, but they have never given less of their means, they have never attended the church’s services less, they have never seen their family less, they have never prayed less, they have never studied the Bible less and their life has never reflected a more thank-less spiritual attitude than ever before!

This is partly why the apostle Paul said, “For the love of money is a root of all kinds of evil, for which some have strayed from the faith in their greediness, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows.” (1 Timothy 6:10)

Truth be told, “well off” does not necessarily mean “worse off” but it definitely does not always mean “better off” either! EA

Then Jesus looked around and said to His disciples, “How hard it is for those who have riches to enter the kingdom of God!” And the disciples were astonished at His words. But Jesus answered again and said to them, “Children, how hard it is for those who trust in riches to enter the kingdom of God!” (Mark 10:23-24)