Month: February 2014

Will God Bring Peace To My Family?

Few problems burden our sanity like family problems. When issues divide us from the people we’re closest to it hurts, and it can hurt really bad. And when we hurt like that we look for answers where we can find them, and more often than not the average person is more interested in drawing close to God when troublesome times draw near than at any other time – and this is especially true when family ties feel like they’re going to be cut. And a civil-war brewing under our roof can make a person want to know if God will bring peace to their family.

While I can completely and personally understand the want, most people ask the wrong question when it comes to God and family and peace. It’s not a matter of God’s will; it’s a matter of our own. The question that we should ask is, “Can God bring peace to my family?” Because the answer to that question is, yes! God wants families to live in peace with one another. But will God bring peace to every family? Sadly, the answer to that is, no. And he won’t because every family member won’t want the peace that he offers.

When family problems arise I encourage everyone to remember that just because you draw near to God doesn’t mean that others will follow with you, and Jesus said this much himself (Luke 12:51-53). So if we want the peace of God in our family we need to start by having it within our self – because we might be the only ones who know anything about it. EA

Be anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication, with thanksgiving, let your requests be made known to God; and the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus.” (Philippians 4:6-7)

Knot a Care

If a husband and wife wants to be one flesh in the way that God intends for us to be then we have to care about each other in a way that ties the marriage knot so tight that all the changes of life that come our way can’t loosen it. So if we learn to care for our spouse better than we care for our self then we won’t be able to keep from being one flesh (Ephesians 5:31).

Unless we care about each other we will get stuck on everything but each other and change in ways that aren’t good. One of the most common things that people will say when their marriage relationship sours is that the other person changed, and more often than not there’s something to that. People changing as we go through life is normal and not necessarily a bad thing – more than likely there’s not a single person who’s reading this living life as the same person that they were five years ago. But when we start to change in a way that causes us to care less about our spouse and family then we’re not changing for the better, and the change won’t be worth it. This type of change doesn’t start with our body, our job, our hobbies or our habits all by themselves. It starts in our heart and mind, and then it moves from our feelings to our words and actions.

But when we care about each other there will be a commitment that keeps us together no matter the change. Being committed means that we’re in it for better or worse, for sickness or health, for richer or poorer and whatever opposite end of the spectrums you can think of. My wife is not the same person that she was when we got married – and I’m not either. But however I feel about the changes in her life I’ve got to remember that whatever they are I’m going to be committed to her through them.

Now I’m not saying that we ignore sinful behavior or that my relationship with God takes a back seat for the sake of my relationship with my wife. But what I am saying is that if we care about each other in a godly way then there will be a commitment that the world won’t be able to ignore, and a commitment that God will bless.

When one person cares about the other the other person won’t be able to deny it. And that’s because our time, our heart and our life will belong to them and they’ll know it. Yes, that also means that our flaws are going to belong to them too. But when we care we’ll learn to put our flaws and their flaws in their right perspective and that perspective is the one that says, “I know I care for them and I know they care for me.” And when we know that then we’ll have a knot that ties us together for good. EA

So husbands ought to love their own wives as their own bodies; he who loves his wife loves himself. For no one ever hated his own flesh, but nourishes and cherishes it, just as the Lord does the church. For we are members of His body, of His flesh and of His bones. “For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh.” This is a great mystery, but I speak concerning Christ and the church. Nevertheless let each one of you in particular so love his own wife as himself, and let the wife see that she respects her husband.” (Ephesians 5:28-33)

Looking for what can’t be seen…yet

A common theme with God’s people, and by that I mean people who were living in and going after a right relationship with God, all throughout the Bible was their yearning to see something that they couldn’t see at the time that they wanted to see it. They had a hope that looked forward to something that they wanted, or even possessed, but they just didn’t have it, or they weren’t able to see it…yet.

Hebrews 11:8 and-16, 24-27 reminds us that Abraham, Sarah, Isaac, Jacob and even Moses heard the calling of God and went after what God had promised them, exchanging the visible world for the unseen promises of God. They did this knowing that to the world, the promises of God made no sense – but they held on because they knew they would see the land of God, their heavenly home, and the One who called them through His word.

As Christians our faith causes us to walk toward something that we cannot see right now, but at the same time we know we’re going to see it eventually. We possess it by hope and we see it by faith (2 Corinthians 5:7Hebrews 6:13-19). It’s as Paul said in 2 Corinthians 4:18-5:1:

For our light affliction, which is but for a moment, is working for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory, while we do not look at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen. For the things which are seen are temporary, but the things which are not seen are eternal. For we know that if our earthly house, this tent, is destroyed, we have a building from God, a house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens.

The same theme that pushed Abraham, Sarah, Isaac, Jacob and Moses forward was the theme that led Paul as an apostle of Jesus Christ, and it’s the same theme that’s meant to describe us – people who are looking for and holding on to what can’t be seen…yet. And why do we do this? It’s because of the One who makes the promise in His word.

We sing a song that reminds us that “There’s a land that is fairer than day, and by faith we can see it afar, for the Savior waits over the way, to prepare us a dwelling place there.” One of the sweetest things about this land when we get there is that we’ll be able to see it; there will be no more “yet” to hide it from our eyes! But until then, the question must be asked – can you see it, or have you yet to look for it? EA

But the day of the Lord will come as a thief in the night, in which the heavens will pass away with a great noise, and the elements will melt with fervent heat; both the earth and the works that are in it will be burned up. Therefore, since all these things will be dissolved, what manner of persons ought you to be in holy conduct and godliness, looking for and hastening the coming of the day of God, because of which the heavens will be dissolved, being on fire, and the elements will melt with fervent heat?Nevertheless we, according to His promise, look for new heavens and a new earth in which righteousness dwells.” (2 Peter 3:10-13)