How We See Our Self Can Determine What We’ll Hear About Our Self

When Peter saw Jesus perform a miracle he said,

 “…Depart from me, for I am a sinful man, O Lord!” (Luke 5:8).

What did Peter mean by this? Did Peter mean he wanted nothing to do with Jesus? Not at all; Peter was amazed that Jesus wanted anything to do with him! Peter understood there was no pulling the wool over this man’s eyes. Every scale on his heart was as visible as the scales on the fish he just helped to pull out of the water.

Peter told the Lord to depart, but the Lord told Peter to come closer when he told him, “…Do not be afraid. From now on you will catch men.” (Luke 5:10).

On the other hand, many people are going to be told by Jesus,

“…I never knew you; depart from Me, you who practice lawlessness!” (Matthew 7:23)

What does Jesus mean by this? Does this mean Jesus wanted nothing to do with them? Not at all; Jesus is speaking to people who wanted nothing to do with Him! These people failed to realize there is no pulling the wool over Jesus’ eyes. The outward scale of good works won’t overrule a refusal to remove the inward scales of a rebellious heart.

Until we learn to obey from the heart the doctrine of God (Romans 6:15-19) and see our self correctly (James 1:21-26), we may hear something about our self we don’t expect! EA

Examine yourselves as to whether you are in the faith. Test yourselves. Do you not know yourselves, that Jesus Christ is in you? – unless indeed you are disqualified.” (2 Corinthians 13:5)

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4 comments

  1. That’s a great way to look at Lk 5.10, associating the mission of Christ which Peter would assume with drawing near to him. Right on. No way to be closer to the Lord than to be caught up in his task. Thanks for this wonderful expression and insight.

    1. Thanks, Randal. I just thought it was interesting how the one phrase “depart from me” can lead in two different directions. I believe you’re spot on with your “task” comment. Have a good un’ brother.

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